. .. . . .

Article on the
Androgyne Online
Website

. . the cover of Transgender Tapestry #107
33k
. .


Printed in
Transgender Tapestry
#107

. .. .

Transgender Tapestry is a publication of the IFGE (International Foundation for Gender Education).


  • The article as printed in Transgender Tapestry #107 (directly below)
  • The article as it was originally submitted
  • The two versions of the article compared

    From Transgender Tapestry Issue #107 (Fall/Winter 2004), pages 38-39:

    [ published version | original version | version comparison ]

    ANDROGYNE ONLINE
    by Stephe Feldman

    Twenty-five years ago, I became infatuated with David Bowie and resentful because I didn't look androgynous myself. Back then, I didn't realize that I was indeed androgynous because I had assumed one couldn't be androgynous without looking the part. I realize it now, and yet there is no literature to support my conclusions, only a grateful dozen or so people who have e-mailed me to say how my essay at Androgyne Online described them to a T.

    The following, then, is a description of a type of transgender person called androgyne -- unsupported by academic rigor and scientific corroboration, yet warranted by the emergent visibility of a real class of people who fall outside the gender binarism of man and woman.

    With the recent ascendancy of the term genderqueer threatening its currency, it has become necessary to explain the term and category of androgyne before it's too late. Androgyne has existed as a term in art history and religious studies for at least 200 years, and in alchemical circles for perhaps 500 years. Up until the last century, the term was used mostly to indicate hermaphrodism, but since in the abstract it was symbolic of unity and transcendence, it was related to androgyny, too.

    Androgyne (pronounced ANDRA-jine), from the Greek for man/woman, can be a state of mind, not just an attitude or fashion statement. The notion that only androgynous-looking people can be or are androgynous is a misconception. Androgynes have the gender identity of both a man and a woman -- or neither. Some identify with both traditional genders, while others see their identity as more of a synthesis and consider themselves to be agendered, other, or none of the above. Some even go as far as to claim Kate Bornstein's term gender outlaw. Out of all the categories of transgender, androgynes are the most misunderstood, because nearly everyone thinks that one must decisively identify as either a man or a woman.

    Having an androgynous appearance does not necessarily make a person an androgyne. The word androgynous can apply to both superficial and psychological characteristics, whereas the word androgyne pertains almost specifically to gender identity. Indeed, it can be said that all androgynes are psychologically androgynous but not all androgynous-looking people are androgynes. Much in the way that many transsexuals are transsexual without looking at all like the sex they perceive themselves to be, many androgynes are androgyne without looking the part. Unfortunately, most psychological androgynes do not understand who and what they are and they may agonize for years -- if not their entire lives -- wondering how it is that they can feel androgynous if they don't look that way.

    Psychological androgyny -- which is basically just another way of referring to the state of being androgyne -- can be maddening. Trying to display outwardly what is inside can be difficult, and the results are often interpreted by outsiders not as androgynous, but as novice crossdresser or non-passing transsexual, i.e. the dreaded man in a dress. Being born with androgynous looks is one thing. Trying to make oneself appear to be androgynous is another. I myself can attest to this, I assure you.

    Androgyny is a double-edged sword. While those born with androgynous looks -- especially if they are not androgynes -- often wish that their gender presentation was unambiguous so as to not be teased, harassed or mistaken for another sex, those psychological androgynes who are born without androgynous looks often wish that their gender presentation was markedly ambiguous so as to convey outwardly what they feel inwardly. It amounts to a case of the metaphorical grass being greener on the other side of the fence, where psychological androgynes and mono-gendered androgynous folk envy each other for attributes they do not share. Some fortunate souls, however, both look and feel androgynous.

    Most androgynes don't realize their androgyne nature. This is because there isn't a lot of data on androgynes as yet; there are few studies, virtually no tabloid TV, and no movies on the subject, mostly because androgynes generally don't experience a mental breakdown or epiphany of self-realization like many transsexuals do where they suddenly decide they either have to live their lives as the opposite sex or do themselves in. Most androgynes live lives of quiet desperation, never realizing who and what they truly are: neither men nor women.

    Sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity are three separate and different things. Sex refers to what's between your legs, while gender refers to what's between your ears. Since gender identity refers to how one views oneself, a person can consider themselves to be a man (masculine), a woman (feminine), or androgyne. It has been observed that since androgynes do not have a "gender-based opposite," they are therefore attracted to each other, and if this is so, it frees androgynes to be both tranny and trannychaser simultaneously. I suspect that androgynes are predisposed toward trannychaserdom (or should that be trannychasing?) because they identify with neither or both traditional genders and therefore feel an affinity with people of mixed or unfixed gender and/or sex. This allows androgynes much freedom, and in a way lends weight to the term third gender, because since androgynes are neither men nor women, sexual orientation isn't really an issue.

    This corresponds nicely with some intersex individuals' claims that intersex folk cannot be gay nor bisexual because they are neither male nor female -- which is interesting because androgynes can be said to be the psychological counterpart to the intersexed. The term intergender(ed) has been coined to reflect this, and some people go even further, saying androgynes have intersexed brains.

    In the transgender community, a lot of lip service is given to gender being a spectrum, continuum, or sphere, but in reality, these are little more than glib statements that all too few people question or otherwise examine. Transsexuals generally display a pattern of avoiding contact with and otherwise invalidating androgynes because they view androgyny as an intermediate stage (i.e a necessary evil) in transsexual transitioning. Androgynes, by association, draw unwanted attention to possible self-perceived defects in transsexuals' gender presentations, and since most transsexuals want nothing more than to blend into the woodwork as their intended sex, this inevitably creates problems.

    That said, some transsexuals are androgyne but don't realize it due to pressure from within themselves and from the transsexual community. Although transsexuals tend to buy into the binary categories of man and woman even more than straight, non-gender-conflicted people buy into them, there is such a thing as an androgyne transsexual: a person who changes their physical sex or otherwise lives as their preferred sex yet retains an androgyne identity. Discovering an underlying androgyne nature within themselves has caused some would-be transsexuals to drastically reevaluate their situation to the point of swearing off genital reassignment surgery. Other androgyne transsexuals decide to embrace their androgyne nature and live as transgenderists or hormone-enhanced non-operative transsexuals, and there are even those who proceed with genital reassignment surgery despite their realization -- this needn't be viewed as a tragedy. It is a matter of one's sense of self.

    How does one ascertain whether or not one is androgyne? It really boils down to what you yourself think. Do you consider yourself to have masculine character traits and feelings as well as feminine character traits and feelings to the extent that you feel repressed if you deny either of these for any extended period of time? If so, you may well be androgyne.

    While it is a common truism that no one is entirely masculine or entirely feminine, androgynes' feelings of identity run deeper than this. For them, it is not a vestigial or incidental overlap of traits, but an inherent, vital component of their being. In fact, once androgynes find themselves, masculinity and femininity often cease to be polarities for them.

    There is the possibility that the term genderqueer might replace androgyne. The term is new (no more than four years old), has overt political and activist aspects, and -- derived as it is from women's studies -- is skewed towards college-educated female-born androgynes, but it might yet turn out to be little more than a euphemism for genderf**k. Androgynes as a whole don't wish to be any more confrontational than the next person, and that is perhaps the difference between androgynes and genderqueers.

    Quite often, a stranger will view as confrontational an androgyne who is trying perhaps unsuccessfully to portray their inner self, but that is the stranger's own preconception superimposed onto what the androgyne is really doing, which is trying to be their true self in a world that assumes that there are only two categories of gender. Genderqueers, however, often appear driven to dismantle the gender binary categorically, so I think it might eventually prove necessary to distinguish between the genderqueer movement and individual genderqueers, much in the way that Christianity as a whole is not indicative of individual Christians. In such a context, one might imagine androgynes as secular genderqueers.

    Shorn of politics and radical agendas, androgynes are non-binary gender variants, plain and simple.


    Stephe Feldman has a B.A. in semiotics from Brown University and an M.S. in library science from Simmons College with an M.S in library science [sic]. She writes: "It took more than twenty years for me to recognize my androgyne nature, and much of the reason for that is the dearth of information on the subject. To fill the void, in April 2001 I created a website, Androgyne Online, at http://androgyne.0catch.com, so others might come to understand themselves without having to go through months of soul-searching and anguish like I did. Most of the conclusions I reached are the result of exchanges with subscribers to the androgynes@yahoogroups.com internet mailing list."


    For those with a nagging need to know, Steph [sic] is a male-born androgyne. -- Ed.


    Original Version, Final Draft, written April 2004:

    [ published version | original version | version comparison ]

    ANDROGYNE ONLINE
    by Stephe Feldman

    This article purports to be a comprehensive explanation of who and what androgynes are. It took over twenty years for me to recognize my androgyne nature, and much of the reason for that is the dearth of information on the subject. Subsequently, I created a website, Androgyne Online, at http://androgyne.0catch.com, to fill the void, so that others might come to understand themselves and not have to go through months of soul-searching and anguish like I did. Most of the conclusions I reached are the result of exchanges with subscribers to the androgynes@yahoogroups.com internet mailing list.

    Twenty-five years ago, I became infatuated with David Bowie and resented the fact that I didn't look androgynous myself. Back then, I didn't realize that I was indeed androgynous because I had assumed that one couldn't be androgynous without looking the part. I realize it now, and yet there is no literature to support my conclusions, only a grateful dozen or so people who have e-mailed me to say how the essay at Androgyne Online described them to a "T."

    The following, then, is a description of a type of transgender person called androgyne, unsupported by academic rigor and scientific corroboration, yet warranted by the emergent visibility of a very real class of people who fall outside the gender binarism of man and woman. For those with a nagging need to know, I am a male-born androgyne.

    With the recent ascendancy of the term genderqueer threatening its currency, it has become necessary to explain the term and category of androgyne before it's too late. Androgyne has existed as a term in art history and religious studies for at least 200 years, and in alchemical circles for perhaps 500 years. Up until the last century, the term was used mostly to indicate hermaphrodism, but since in the abstract it was symbolic of unity and transcendence, it was related to androgyny, too.

    Androgyne (pronounced ANDRA-jine), from the Greek for man/woman, is the term used to describe persons who are androgynous, but androgyny can be a state of mind, not just an attitude or fashion statement. The notion that only androgynous-looking people can be or are androgynous is a misconception. Androgynes have the gender identity of both a man and a woman -- or neither. Some identify with both traditional genders, while others see their identity as more of a synthesis and consider themselves to be agendered, "other," or "none of the above." Some even go as far as to claim Kate Bornstein's term gender outlaw. Out of all the categories of transgender, androgynes are the most misunderstood, because nearly everyone thinks that one must decisively identify as either a man or a woman.

    Having an androgynous appearance does not necessarily make a person (an) androgyne. The word androgynous can apply to both superficial and psychological characteristics, whereas the word androgyne pertains almost specifically to gender identity. Indeed, it can be said that all androgynes are (psychologically) androgynous but not all androgynous(-looking) people are androgynes. Much in the way that many transsexuals are transsexual without looking at all like the sex they perceive themselves to be, many androgynes are androgyne without looking the part. Unfortunately, most psychological androgynes do not understand who and what they are and they may agonize for years -- if not their entire lives -- wondering how it is that they can feel androgynous if they don't look that way.

    Psychological androgyny -- which is basically just another way of referring to the state of being androgyne -- can be maddening. Trying to display outwardly what is inside can be difficult, and the results are often interpreted by outsiders not as "androgynous," but as "novice crossdresser" or "non-passing transsexual," i.e. the dreaded "man in a dress." Being born with androgynous looks is one thing. Trying to make oneself appear to be androgynous is another. I myself can attest to this, I assure you.

    Androgyny is a double-edged sword, of sorts. While those born with androgynous looks -- especially if they are not androgynes -- often wish that their gender presentation was unambiguous so as to not be teased, harassed or mistaken for another sex, those psychological androgynes who are born without androgynous looks often wish that their gender presentation was markedly ambiguous so as to convey outwardly what they feel inwardly. It amounts to a case of the metaphorical grass being greener on the other side of the fence, where psychological androgynes and mono-gendered androgynous folk envy each other for attributes they do not share. Some fortunate souls, however, both look and feel androgynous.

    Most androgynes do not realize their androgyne nature. This is because there is not a lot of data on androgynes as yet, with few studies, virtually no tabloid TV, and no movies on the subject, but also because androgynes generally don't experience a mental breakdown or epiphany of self-realization like many transsexuals do where they suddenly decide they either have to live their lives as the "opposite sex" or do themselves in. Most androgynes live lives of quiet desperation, never realizing who and what they truly are: neither men nor women.

    Sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity are three separate and different things. Sex refers to what's between your legs, while gender refers to what's between your ears. Since gender identity refers to how one views oneself, a person can consider themselves to be a man (masculine), a woman (feminine), or androgyne. It has been observed that since androgynes do not have a "gender-based opposite," they are therefore attracted to each other, and if this is so, it frees androgynes to be both "tranny" and "trannychaser" simultaneously. I suspect that androgynes are predisposed toward trannychaserdom (or should that be trannychasing?) because they identify with neither or both traditional genders and therefore feel an affinity with people of mixed or unfixed gender and/or sex. This allows androgynes much freedom, and in a way lends weight to the term third gender, because since androgynes are neither men nor women, sexual orientation isn't really an issue.

    This corresponds nicely with some intersex individuals' claims that intersex folk cannot be gay nor bisexual because they are neither male nor female, which is interesting because androgynes can be said to be the psychological counterpart to the intersexed. The term intergender(ed) has been coined to reflect this, and some people go even further, saying that androgynes have intersexed brains.

    In the transgender community, a lot of lip service is given to gender being a spectrum, continuum, or sphere, but in reality, these are little more than glib statements that all too few people question or otherwise examine. Transsexuals generally display a pattern of avoiding contact with and otherwise invalidating androgynes because they view androgyny as an intermediate stage (i.e a necessary evil) in transsexual transitioning. Androgynes, by association, draw unwanted attention to possible self-perceived defects in transsexuals' gender presentations, and since most transsexuals want nothing more than to blend into the woodwork as their intended sex, this inevitably creates problems.

    That said, some transsexuals are androgyne but don't realize it due to pressure from within themselves and from the transsexual community. Although transsexuals tend to buy into the "binary" categories of man and woman even more than straight, non-gender-conflicted people do, there is such a thing as an androgyne transsexual: a person who changes their physical sex (or otherwise lives as their preferred sex) yet retains an androgyne identity. Discovering an underlying androgyne nature within themselves has caused some would-be transsexuals to drastically reevaluate their situation to the point of swearing off genital reassignment surgery permanently. Other androgyne transsexuals decide to embrace their androgyne nature and live as transgenderists or hormone-enhanced non-operative transsexuals, and there are even those who proceed with genital reassignment surgery despite their realization, and this needn't be viewed as a tragedy. It is a matter of one's sense of self.

    How does one ascertain whether or not one is androgyne? It really boils down to what you yourself think. Do you consider yourself to have masculine character traits and feelings as well as feminine character traits and feelings to the extent that you feel repressed if you deny either of these for any extended period of time? If so, you may well be androgyne. While it is a common truism that no one is entirely masculine or entirely feminine, androgynes' feelings of identity run deeper than this. For them, it is not a vestigial or incidental overlap of traits, but an inherent, vital component of their being. In fact, once androgynes find themselves, masculinity and femininity often cease to be polarities for them.

    There is the possibility that the term genderqueer might replace androgyne. The term is very new (no more than four years old), has overt political and activist aspects, and -- derived as it is from women's studies -- is skewed towards college-educated female-born androgynes, but it might yet turn out to be little more than a euphemism for genderf**k. Androgynes as a whole don't wish to be any more confrontational than the next person, and that is perhaps the difference between androgynes and genderqueers.

    Quite often, a stranger will view as confrontational an androgyne who is trying perhaps unsuccessfully to portray their inner self, but that is the stranger's own preconception superimposed onto what the androgyne is really doing, which is trying to be their true self in a world that assumes that there are only two categories of gender. Genderqueers, however, often appear driven to dismantle the gender binary categorically, so I think it might eventually prove necessary to distinguish between the genderqueer movement and individual genderqueers, much in the way that Christianity as a whole is not indicative of individual Christians. In such a context, one might imagine androgynes as secular genderqueers.

    Shorn of politics and radical agendas, androgynes are non-binary gender variants, plain and simple.

    -o-

    Stephe Feldman is a graduate of Brown University with a B.A. in semiotics and from Simmons College with an M.S. in library science. Sie created Androgyne Online in April of 2001.




    The two versions of the article compared

    [ published version | original version | version comparison ]

    KEY:
    Black text indicates text common to both versions and appearing in the same place in the article
    Green text indicates text as originally written but removed by the editor at Transgender Tapestry
    Red text indicates text inserted, added or altered by the editor at Transgender Tapestry
    Brown text indicates a comment made by the author, after publication in Transgender Tapestry

    ANDROGYNE ONLINE
    by Stephe Feldman

    This article purports to be a comprehensive explanation of who and what androgynes are. It took over twenty years for me to recognize my androgyne nature, and much of the reason for that is the dearth of information on the subject. Subsequently, I created a website, Androgyne Online, at http://androgyne.0catch.com, to fill the void, so that others might come to understand themselves and not have to go through months of soul-searching and anguish like I did. Most of the conclusions I reached are the result of exchanges with subscribers to the androgynes@yahoogroups.com internet mailing list.

    Twenty-five years ago, I became infatuated with David Bowie and resented the fact that resentful because I didn't look androgynous myself. Back then, I didn't realize that I was indeed androgynous because I had assumed that one couldn't be androgynous without looking the part. I realize it now, and yet there is no literature to support my conclusions, only a grateful dozen or so people who have e-mailed me to say how the my essay at Androgyne Online described them to a "T."

    The following, then, is a description of a type of transgender person called androgyne, -- unsupported by academic rigor and scientific corroboration, yet warranted by the emergent visibility of a very real class of people who fall outside the gender binarism of man and woman. For those with a nagging need to know, I am a male-born androgyne.

    With the recent ascendancy of the term genderqueer threatening its currency, it has become necessary to explain the term and category of androgyne before it's too late. Androgyne has existed as a term in art history and religious studies for at least 200 years, and in alchemical circles for perhaps 500 years. Up until the last century, the term was used mostly to indicate hermaphrodism, but since in the abstract it was symbolic of unity and transcendence, it was related to androgyny, too.

    Androgyne (pronounced ANDRA-jine), from the Greek for man/woman, is the term used to describe persons who are androgynous, but androgyny [it is odd that this section was removed] can be a state of mind, not just an attitude or fashion statement. The notion that only androgynous-looking people can be or are androgynous is a misconception. Androgynes have the gender identity of both a man and a woman -- or neither. Some identify with both traditional genders, while others see their identity as more of a synthesis and consider themselves to be agendered, "other," or "none of the above." Some even go as far as to claim Kate Bornstein's term gender outlaw. Out of all the categories of transgender, androgynes are the most misunderstood, because nearly everyone thinks that one must decisively identify as either a man or a woman.

    Having an androgynous appearance does not necessarily make a person (an) androgyne. The word androgynous can apply to both superficial and psychological characteristics, whereas the word androgyne pertains almost specifically to gender identity. Indeed, it can be said that all androgynes are (psychologically) androgynous but not all androgynous(-looking) people are androgynes. Much in the way that many transsexuals are transsexual without looking at all like the sex they perceive themselves to be, many androgynes are androgyne without looking the part. Unfortunately, most psychological androgynes do not understand who and what they are and they may agonize for years -- if not their entire lives -- wondering how it is that they can feel androgynous if they don't look that way.

    Psychological androgyny -- which is basically just another way of referring to the state of being androgyne -- can be maddening. Trying to display outwardly what is inside can be difficult, and the results are often interpreted by outsiders not as "androgynous," but as "novice crossdresser" or "non-passing transsexual," i.e. the dreaded "man in a dress." Being born with androgynous looks is one thing. Trying to make oneself appear to be androgynous is another. I myself can attest to this, I assure you.

    Androgyny is a double-edged sword, of sorts. While those born with androgynous looks -- especially if they are not androgynes -- often wish that their gender presentation was unambiguous so as to not be teased, harassed or mistaken for another sex, those psychological androgynes who are born without androgynous looks often wish that their gender presentation was markedly ambiguous so as to convey outwardly what they feel inwardly. It amounts to a case of the metaphorical grass being greener on the other side of the fence, where psychological androgynes and mono-gendered androgynous folk envy each other for attributes they do not share. Some fortunate souls, however, both look and feel androgynous.

    Most androgynes do not don't realize their androgyne nature. This is because there is not isn't a lot of data on androgynes as yet,; with there are few studies, virtually no tabloid TV, and no movies on the subject, but also mostly because androgynes generally don't experience a mental breakdown or epiphany of self-realization like many transsexuals do where they suddenly decide they either have to live their lives as the "opposite sex" or do themselves in. Most androgynes live lives of quiet desperation, never realizing who and what they truly are: neither men nor women.

    Sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity are three separate and different things. Sex refers to what's between your legs, while gender refers to what's between your ears. Since gender identity refers to how one views oneself, a person can consider themselves to be a man (masculine), a woman (feminine), or androgyne. It has been observed that since androgynes do not have a "gender-based opposite," they are therefore attracted to each other, and if this is so, it frees androgynes to be both "tranny" and "trannychaser" simultaneously. I suspect that androgynes are predisposed toward trannychaserdom (or should that be trannychasing?) because they identify with neither or both traditional genders and therefore feel an affinity with people of mixed or unfixed gender and/or sex. This allows androgynes much freedom, and in a way lends weight to the term third gender, because since androgynes are neither men nor women, sexual orientation isn't really an issue.

    This corresponds nicely with some intersex individuals' claims that intersex folk cannot be gay nor bisexual because they are neither male nor female, -- which is interesting because androgynes can be said to be the psychological counterpart to the intersexed. The term intergender(ed) has been coined to reflect this, and some people go even further, saying that androgynes have intersexed brains.

    In the transgender community, a lot of lip service is given to gender being a spectrum, continuum, or sphere, but in reality, these are little more than glib statements that all too few people question or otherwise examine. Transsexuals generally display a pattern of avoiding contact with and otherwise invalidating androgynes because they view androgyny as an intermediate stage (i.e a necessary evil) in transsexual transitioning. Androgynes, by association, draw unwanted attention to possible self-perceived defects in transsexuals' gender presentations, and since most transsexuals want nothing more than to blend into the woodwork as their intended sex, this inevitably creates problems.

    That said, some transsexuals are androgyne but don't realize it due to pressure from within themselves and from the transsexual community. Although transsexuals tend to buy into the "binary" categories of man and woman even more than straight, non-gender-conflicted people do buy into them, there is such a thing as an androgyne transsexual: a person who changes their physical sex (or otherwise lives as their preferred sex) yet retains an androgyne identity. Discovering an underlying androgyne nature within themselves has caused some would-be transsexuals to drastically reevaluate their situation to the point of swearing off genital reassignment surgery permanently. Other androgyne transsexuals decide to embrace their androgyne nature and live as transgenderists or hormone-enhanced non-operative transsexuals, and there are even those who proceed with genital reassignment surgery despite their realization, and -- this needn't be viewed as a tragedy. It is a matter of one's sense of self.

    How does one ascertain whether or not one is androgyne? It really boils down to what you yourself think. Do you consider yourself to have masculine character traits and feelings as well as feminine character traits and feelings to the extent that you feel repressed if you deny either of these for any extended period of time? If so, you may well be androgyne. While it is a common truism that no one is entirely masculine or entirely feminine, androgynes' feelings of identity run deeper than this. For them, it is not a vestigial or incidental overlap of traits, but an inherent, vital component of their being. In fact, once androgynes find themselves, masculinity and femininity often cease to be polarities for them.

    There is the possibility that the term genderqueer might replace androgyne. The term is very new (no more than four years old), has overt political and activist aspects, and -- derived as it is from women's studies -- is skewed towards college-educated female-born androgynes, but it might yet turn out to be little more than a euphemism for genderf**k. Androgynes as a whole don't wish to be any more confrontational than the next person, and that is perhaps the difference between androgynes and genderqueers.

    Quite often, a stranger will view as confrontational an androgyne who is trying perhaps unsuccessfully to portray their inner self, but that is the stranger's own preconception superimposed onto what the androgyne is really doing, which is trying to be their true self in a world that assumes that there are only two categories of gender. Genderqueers, however, often appear driven to dismantle the gender binary categorically, so I think it might eventually prove necessary to distinguish between the genderqueer movement and individual genderqueers, much in the way that Christianity as a whole is not indicative of individual Christians. In such a context, one might imagine androgynes as secular genderqueers.

    Shorn of politics and radical agendas, androgynes are non-binary gender variants, plain and simple.

    -o-

    Stephe Feldman is a graduate of Brown University with a B.A. in semiotics and from Simmons College with an M.S. in library science. Sie created Androgyne Online in April of 2001.

    Stephe Feldman has a B.A. in semiotics from Brown University and an M.S. in library science from Simmons College with an M.S in library science [sic]. She writes: "It took more than twenty years for me to recognize my androgyne nature, and much of the reason for that is the dearth of information on the subject. To fill the void, in April 2001 I created a website, Androgyne Online, at http://androgyne.0catch.com, so others might come to understand themselves without having to go through months of soul-searching and anguish like I did. Most of the conclusions I reached are the result of exchanges with subscribers to the androgynes@yahoogroups.com internet mailing list."


    For those with a nagging need to know, Steph [sic] is a male-born androgyne. -- Ed.


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    This page first created 3/26/05. Copyright Stephe Feldman, 2005. Last update: 6/23/06.